Scream – Complete Control Sessions

Washington DC’s punk rock is back!
By Stella Bruk

The boy’s grew up and went their separate ways, and now they return, and come back with surprises.

Since 1993’s Fumble album which was actually recorded in 1990, Pete, Franz, Skeeter and Kent haven’t met for a single project.

The idea of getting together began to take shape in 2009 when Pete and Franz played together at Black Cat in Washington on December 2009 and again almost a year later in October 2010 at the Echo in LA. They all met at the Redwood last February to an insane audience, with the presence of former band member Dave Grohl, as the ordinary fan. When Dave joined Scream in 1987 he lied about his age claiming he was 20 when he was actually 17. On that night they played old songs “Still Screaming” and “This Side Up,” and new ones that included – “Stopwatch” and the one off “Jammin’ at Redwood” (originally titled Jammin’ at 606). The barrier separating the audience from the band no longer mattered because Pete Stahl and members of the audience were crowd surfing in true punk rock style.

In February2011, the four original band members Pete Stahl (vocals), Franz Stahl (guitar), Skeeter Thompson (bass) and Kent Stax (drums), went in the studio to record plus the new guitarist Clint Walsh and Dave Grohl, who ‘indirectly participated’, coz the new album was recorded entirely at Dave Grohl’s Studio 606. They met and practised what would be the second album of the project Complete Control Session. These series of studio recordings are on Side One of Dummy Records co-owners nationally syndicated all punk rock “Complete Control Radio” show. The music is released on 10” vinyl and via digital download on August 16th, 2011 via Side One Dummy Records. The first official release in the series was done by The Bouncing Souls in April 2011.

To complete this and give the album the Midas touch, John Lousteau was in charge of producing the seven-track EP Scream’s Complete Control Session which features the following tracks : Stopwatch, Get Free, Jamin at 606, Elevate, The Year Bald Head Singers Were In, Move All, Demolition Dancing.

With loads of post-hardcore riffs, power chords, multi-tracked duelling guitar tones and raw screams, the EP makes us push the furniture to the side of the room and mosh like we did years ago.

Listen the track “Stopwatch”, on their website http://www.screamdc.com/

Punk rock is not dead that’s for sure!

The Pietasters – Awesome Mix Tape #6

(c) 1999 Hellcat Records
Rating: ★★★★☆

Set aside special time each day during which you devote your time to this precious record. The Pietasters are back again with their new studio release “Awesome Mix Tape #6” (out August 3rd on hellcat) What is it about The Pietasters that just grabs my soul and whips it around and won’t let go? I’ll be damned if I can pinpoint it, but something about this seven piece Ska band from DC just makes me feel allright. Ever since I saw them the first time, opening for the Bosstones, I was hooked. They had an intense quality and a drinking Irish East Coast Swagger. None of this is lost on the new release. I have heard a lot of negativity from people after Willis came out, bitching that it wasn’t as good as ooolooloo. Damn them I say, The Pietasters are a brilliant band with amazing musicianship that comes across even better live. On the new release they weave a exciting blend of traditional ska, dub, reggae and soul with the occasional punkesque guitar, combined with clever even if somewhat chauvanistic lyrics. the effect as a whole creates an album not only worthy of the 4 “ups” I gave it, but an album that gets better every time you play it (if your not convinced, refer to the first sentence.)

–Jerry Actually

Mike Ivey of Basehead

Interview with Mike Ivey of Basehead
Conducted via email 11/08

Jerry ActuallyWhen “Play With Toys” came out it was greeted with a decent amount of attention, but by the time “Not In Kansas Anymore” was released, Basehead seemed to have faded back into obscurity.  Was I just not paying attention to the right channels, or did your audience pick up the ball and then drop it?

Mike Ivey – Actually, the fade back to obscurity was after “Not In Kansas Anymore,” and after we recorded the follow-up “faith” which didn’t get a major label release after parent label Imago’s BMG distribution deal ended.  Prior to that Kansas sold about as much as Toys, we did got some press, and we toured opening for Stone Temple Pilots, Butthole Surfers & fIREHOSE, as well as on our own and in Europe.  Therefore the fade to obscurity was a bit more gradual than described above.

Jerry ActuallyIn regard to the question above question, basehead came about a few years before the massive proliferation of the internet and the whole peer to peer file share phenomenon.  Do you think if basehead would have been more in line with this that things would have unfolded differently?

Mike Ivey – Actually, things unfolded the way they needed to.  “Play With Toys” came out right just as Soundscan was in the process of rolling out, and that multi-year run ended right before the internet really got going, so I feel fortunate to have experienced the record business prior to the traditional industry model falling apart.  I’ve always been skeptical of the panacea of promises of the internet age, particularly in regards to how artists are supposed to be paid for work when everything is available for free.  But in general, it’s a cost-effective means for marketing and communications in the 360 degree-DIY business model that the future seems to be calling for.


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